Busy-ness

So much of healthy pastoring is learning how to be “unbusy” as Eugene Peterson calls it. It is the ability to minister from a place of sureness, identity and peace. Richard Foster would call it otium sanctum or “holy leisure” – the ability to slow down and be fully present in everyday life. This slowness, this timelessness, is the distinguishing feature of a saint who has lingered in the presence of the Loving Father. There is no need to rush, no compelling need to prove oneself to others when you are grounded in Reality.

So why are we (pastors included) so busy? I like what Eugene Peterson has to say in “The Contemplative Pastor: Returning to the Art of Spiritual Direction.” On pages 18 and 19 he says:

I am busy because I am vain. I want to appear important. What better way than to be busy? The incredible hours, the crowded schedule, and the heavy demands on my time are proof to myself and to all who will notice — that I am important… I live in a society in which crowded schedules and harassed conditions are evidence of importance, so I develop a crowded schedule and harassed conditions. When others notice, they acknowledge my significance, and my vanity is fed.

I am busy because I am lazy. I let others decide what I will do instead of resolutely deciding myself. It was a favorite theme of C.S. Lewis that only lazy people work hard. By lazily abdicating the essential work of deciding and directing, establishing values and setting goals, other people do it for us.

I would add to Peterson’s insights, I am busy because I am afraid. So often busyness becomes an anesthetic. When I am busy I don’t have the time for self-awareness and evaluation. When I am busy I don’t have to think about or deal with my past hurts and brokenness.

Silence is the bane of our age it seems, for in silence, in unbusyness, the Holy Spirit begins to speak, gently bringing to mind all of the things He would like us to turn over to Jesus. But we are uncomfortable with such an intimate and invasive God who earnestly desires every aspect of our hearts – so we drown Him out with iTunes or find something more “productive” to do. But we stunt our spiritual growth, and greatly jeopardize those under our care, when we refuse to slow down and surrender our schedules to God.

Have you ever met someone who embodied holy leisure? What impact did that have on you? Can you imagine what life would be like if you let God rearrange your scheduled priorities?

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